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Americans don't use the word "queue"?

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  • nyd
    started a topic Americans don't use the word "queue"?

    Americans don't use the word "queue"?

    Most people in usa got confused when I asked "Is this the queue?", "Where is the queue?" or "Do I have to queue?"

    Do Americans not use the word "queue"?!
    (I just checked and it is a valid word in American English)

  • NerdaliciouS
    replied
    Originally posted by Gymp View Post
    Queue is still used here where I am in Canada although not that often.I heard "get in the queue" on more than one occasion,I've used that word in scrabble more than once for some big point words if the "Q" is on the triple letter score or the word lies on a triple word score.

    Gymp
    Whew, it's not just the west that uses it then! Sometimes it varies by where you go. I've also used the word in scrabble, though. Most times people end up looking it up in a dictionary. o.o

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  • Gymp
    replied
    Originally posted by Dodger67 View Post
    ...There's also a Cue - used in playing pool, billiards and snooker...
    "Cue"... is also the nickname of one of my friends...

    Queue is still used here where I am in Canada although not that often.I heard "get in the queue" on more than one occasion,I've used that word in scrabble more than once for some big point words if the "Q" is on the triple letter score or the word lies on a triple word score.

    Gymp

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  • Dodger67
    replied
    Queue is also the name of the traditional Chinese long plaited "pigtail".

    There's also a Cue - used in playing pool, billiards and snooker.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dodger67
    replied
    I was really just wondering if there were any issues specifically related to disability. Given that "Obamacare" was such a hot topic not so long ago, I'm a bit surprised that it's gone so quiet.

    Y'all really wanna be stirred? Here's a little light reading:
    http://works.bepress.com/cgi/viewcon...ntext=sagitmor
    I expect a 500 word review of this article - by Monday.
    Have nice weekend!

    While I'm on the topic of the weekend:
    Don't forget to do something really important - play with a child.
    If you don't have any of your own, borrow some from relatives, friends or neighbours.

    Leave a comment:


  • LisaJoy
    replied
    That is hilarious, Jill! And good for her, knowing how to write "Q" at 4.5!

    Leave a comment:


  • Jill
    replied
    In Canada, I know what queue means and if someone used the word I wouldn't be confused or anything. I think I have used it before, but it's definitely not commonplace and there's a good chance others might not know what you're talking about.

    I just asked my 4.5yo if she knew what a queue was. She asked for a pen and drew a Q.

    Leave a comment:


  • eng188
    replied
    Originally posted by Dodger67 View Post
    Well those two short simple words can be pronounced many different ways.
    The wide variety of spoken English lies in the complexity and sheer number of it's vowel phonemes. Many sources say English has 26 distinct vowels. The most common vowel (the schwa) doesn't even have its own letter!
    Phonetically, it is represented by an upsidedown e, but indeed, I've never seen that symbol in any actual alphabets of any language.

    How are you with clicks? Ever get the chance to use them?

    Leave a comment:


  • susieatmg
    replied
    Ordering a beverage can be complicated lol. Down south if you say you want "tea" it will be sweet tea unless repeatedly specified otherwise but up north if you order tea it will never be sweet unless you order "sweet" tea. And when I am referring to tea I mean ice tea......not hot tea. I know very few that drink hot tea....all my friends and family drink coffee.

    BTW Dodger, I am getting the impression that you get bored sometimes and like to get things stirred up - from some of your recent posts lol.......I mean really, asking about the elections? Wow! You are brave! And everyone was so civilized in their responses but you have to know that most were having to restrain themselves, whichever side they are on.....lol

    Leave a comment:


  • jellolegs23
    replied
    I just saw one of my friends used the word "queue" on facebook but she used it in a way that meant "list"

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  • Dodger67
    replied
    Well those two short simple words can be pronounced many different ways.
    The wide variety of spoken English lies in the complexity and sheer number of it's vowel phonemes. Many sources say English has 26 distinct vowels. The most common vowel (the schwa) doesn't even have its own letter!
    Last edited by Dodger67; 11-04-2010, 08:07 AM.

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  • nyd
    replied
    Originally posted by Dodger67 View Post
    I think its the wierd spelling that confuses the rebels.
    LoL, but as a foreign language learner of English, I prefer weird spelling to difficult pronunciation. "Queue" may look weird, but is very easy to pronounce. I personally find simple words such as "ask" and "class" quite challenging to pronounce perfectly.

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  • nyd
    replied
    Originally posted by n3rdchik View Post
    Queue is a very valid english word, but not in use very often - almost never as a verb. We refer "to queue" as "the line" like Nerdlicious said. Where is the line? Do I need to get in this line? etc. Queue is usually a very specific maze of barriers or used for things "We have lots of projects in the queue."

    Does this help?
    Yes, thank you. Seems like it's not customary to use "queue" as a verb only in the US.

    Originally posted by Lifeisgood View Post
    It is funny because here in the US, different regions will even use different words for the same thing. Soda versus pop. Stretcher versus gurney. Etc.
    I am familiar with "soda", "pop" and "soda pop" but hardly ever use them. I usually use the term "soft drink" as it is the word most familiar to those living in the non-western world.
    I know "stretcher" but never heard of "gurney".

    Leave a comment:


  • Lifeisgood
    replied
    It is funny because here in the US, different regions will even use different words for the same thing. Soda versus pop. Stretcher versus gurney. Etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dodger67
    replied
    I think its the wierd spelling that confuses the rebels.

    Leave a comment:

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